Scooter Maintenance

What's in Your Toolbox? - Presented by War Scooters

What's in Your Toolbox? - Presented By War Scooters

Putting together your first pro scooter is a snap, but what happens when you are ready to upgrade parts down the road? Or when a replacement part derails a competition or great day of riding at the park? With the right tools and a little bit of know-how, you can easily get your scooter back in working condition so you can get back to riding.

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Phoenix Switchblade Installation on non-Phoenix Decks

Phoenix Switchblade Installation on non-Phoenix Decks

The best way to improve your current brake, if it's not already a Phoenix Switchblade, is to replace it with a Switchblade.

Scooter riders are always trying to figure out how to dial their scooters. Unfortunately, spring brakes have been a big problem in this area for many years. No matter what you do to them, they almost always rattle to a certain degree. The best thing you can do to solve this problem is to replace the brake with a flex fender style brake. I recommend the Phoenix Switchblade brake as it is extremely high quality, inexpensive, and made of spring steel for long-lasting performance. In addition to cutting down on the rattle, this style of brake will also make it more difficult to lock up your rear wheel so it offers some protection against flat spots.

Unfortunately, most decks are not built for a Phoenix Switchblade, but the process isn't too difficult. If you aren't comfortable using power tools or being precise with alignments, ask a parent or older friend to help you out.

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Lucky HIC Installation

Lucky HIC Installation

HIC stands for Hidden Internal Compression

It seems that Hidden Internal Compression (HIC) systems are becoming more and more popular among freestyle scooter riders. This is because they are simple, cheap, and light compared to SCS systems, which we covered in another tutorial found here: Proto SCS Installation.

The HIC system uses a shim to extend the reach of the fork into the bars and prevent the fork from pulling out of the headtube. The tutorial video in this article uses a Lucky HIC composite shim, Lucky HIC bars, and Lucky HIC oversized clamp, but other HIC systems should work similarly. In terms of true HIC, we've been extremely happy with the Lucky setup.

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Proto SCS Installation

Proto SCS Installation

Installing an SCS clamp system isn't as scary as it seems.

Installing a Standard Compression System (SCS) clamp can be tricky if no one has shown you how to do it right. Even after you get your SCS installed, it can be challenging to get it locked down just right. When dealing with an SCS, the first and most important precaution you should keep in mind is to not let anyone that you don't trust mess with it. Often times, someone might be trying to help when they think they know what they are doing and they might accidentally wreck your $80 clamp. I don't let anyone else work on my kid's scooters not because I don't trust them, but because if I screw it up, then I have to pay for it. If someone else breaks a part, I don't want to deal with that awkward interaction of who has to pay for it.

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Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

A penny is the cheapest tool you can keep in your scooter toolbox!

It can often be difficult to get a clamp and bars to fit together if the clamp is a tight fit for the bars. You don't want to use grease to make them fit together as it will be difficult to get a secure fit later on after you tighten everything. The best method for expanding your clamp for easily fitting it on to your bars is to use the penny trick.

The method outlined below will work for standard clamps, HIC clamps, SCS clamps, and it might even work with the Phoenix iHIC bars/clamp system, but I haven't had a chance to try it out with those yet.

As always, use T-handle allen key wrenches rather than L-shaped allen keys. You can buy a full set of T-handle metric allen keys for less than $10 at Harbor Freight and I highly recommend that you do so.

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Removing Bearings from Metal Core Wheels

Removing Bearings from Metal Core Wheels

Having trouble removing bearings from your metal core wheels? Try using the bearing spacer trick!

Everyone wants metal core wheels because of their superior strength, performance, and durability. However, they have one disadvantage over plastic core wheels: they are much more difficult to get bearings in and out of because they do not flex at all. There are some tricks to removing bearings from metal core wheels and I'm going to show you one method that utilizes the bearing spacer.

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